This page is part of © FOTW Flags Of The World website

Charles Sturt University (New South Wales, Australia)

Last modified: 2010-02-12 by jonathan dixon
Keywords: charles sturt university | sturt's desert pea | book (white) | bars: wavy (white) |
Links: FOTW homepage | search | random flag | disclaimer and copyright | write us | mirrors



See also:


Charles Sturt University

Charles Sturt University was formed in 1989 by the merger of non-university colleges of advanced education in Bathurst, Wagga Wagga and Albury, cities of western New South Wales. It was named for the explorer Charles Sturt. The only university in the state's west, it also has a campus in Dubbo, and has taken over the former Sydney University site in Orange. Like other rural universities, it has many distance education programs.
Jonathan Dixon, 2 November 2008


Adoption of a flag

On 28 February 2008 the Council of Charles Sturt University enacted the Governance (Official Emblems) Rule 2008 No.1. Under clause 11 of the Rule, the Council approved the official University flag being a vertical tricolour with a hoist dimension of 1.0 to a fly dimension of 2.0. The hoist side is a field of CSU Grey (Pantone 423), with a mid-field in Pantone White separating the hoist side and the fly side colours and a fly side in CSU Red (Pantone 200) with the charge (the CSU arms) in Pantone White positioned in the centre of the field. The proportional dimensions are 18:2:80. For ceremonial purposes, the Official Flag may be lined with a gold tassle of no more than 30 millimeters around each edge.

Source: CSU website
Mark Burdack, 30 October 2008

It is interesting that it is described as a "vertical tricolour", when it could be seen as a fimbriated uneven bicolour or even plain field with a hoist panel.

The charge mentioned is the shield of the university arms. It seems to have a grey/silver background, with three blue and two white wavy lines where the bottom of a chief would be. (I am confused by grey and white in the same arms!) These represent the rivers Macquarie, Murrumbidgee and Murray, explored by Charles Sturt and flowing through the regions served by the university, particularly the cities of Albury-Wodonga, Bathurst, Dubbo and Wagga Wagga. Above the lines is an open book, as common for universities, representing the objects of the institution (to promote within the limits of the University's resources, scholarship, research, free inquiry, the interaction of research and teaching, and academic excellence.) Below the lines is a Sturt's Desert Pea (Swainsonia Formosa)flower proper. The Pea was also named for Charles Sturt, and as an Australian native reflects the university's reputation as a national institution.

(Source: CSU webpage on the arms)
Jonathan Dixon, 2 November 2008