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Bahamas

Commonwealth of the Bahamas, The Bahamas

Last modified: 2014-03-28 by zoltán horváth
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[Flag of the Bahamas] (1:2)
image by Clay Moss, 29 April 2009


Official Name: Commonwealth of The Bahamas
Capital: Nassau
Location: Caribbean
Government Type: Constitutional Monarchy (Queen Elizabeth II)
Flag adopted: 10 July 1973
Coat of arms adopted: 7 December 1971
Designer: Hervis Bain
ISO Code:
BS



See also:


The Flag

Concering Album 2000 [pay00] - National Flag. CSW/--- 1:2 - The construction details that are shown around the edges of the image are quite suspicious, unless I have made a mistake counting on fingers myself. The horizontals stripse are of equal width, there is no doubt about that, but vertical division is given as 2+4, i.e. the triangle height is suposed to be 1/3 of the length. Judging from all the pictures I have seen that is entirely wrong - the triangle seems to be of equal sides (i.e. the height is sqrt(3)/2).
Željko Heimer, 7 February 2001

I agree. It is a mistake.
Armand du Payrat, 16 February 2001

Bahamas flag colour shades from Album 2000 are:
Pantone --- CMYK
B  312c  --- 100-0-15-0
Y  115c  ---  0-10-80-0
Santiago Dotor, 26 February 2001

Smith (1975) [smi75b] reported: "The golden sands of the 700 Bahamian islands are reflected in the centre of the flag, while the aquamarine stripes bring to mind the various shades of ocean waters around those islands.  The black triangle indicates the unity of the Bahamian people in their determination to develop the resources of both land and sea."
This seems a bit "embroidered" to me, and given the fact that the flag was fairly new in 1975 when the book was published (and probably brand new when he actually wrote it), I wonder whether Bahamians still see these aspirations in their flag?
Rob Raeside, 12 March 2001

In Album 2000 - Corr. Nr 1 [pay01] - Page BA 1.1 (National flag) - New specifications: ~2.6:~3.4 instead of 2:4 along the horizontal axis.
Ivan Sache, 8 October 2001

In the absence of any official statistics, I have looked at all the available official images I could find, and must agree that the flag should have an equilateral triangle.
This, I calculate, would give 10-10-10 at the hoist, and 13-17 across the top thus confirming the revised figures shown in the Album.
Christopher Southworth, 29 April 2009


National Flag at the London 2012 Olympics

The protocol manual for the London 2012 Olympics (Flags and Anthems Manual London 2012 [loc12]) provides recommendations for national flag designs. Each NOC was sent an image of the flag, including the PMS shades, for their approval by LOCOG. Once this was obtained, LOCOG produced a 60 x 90 cm version of the flag for further approval. So, while these specs may not be the official, government, version of each flag, they are certainly what the NOC believed the flag to be.
For Bahamas: PMS 312 blue, 115 yellow and black. The vertical version is simply the flag turned through 90 degrees clockwise.
Ian Sumner, 10 October 2012


Subdivisions

Bahamas is divided to 21 districts. There are no known flags of those districts. The districts are:
- Acklins and Crooked Islands
- Bimini
- Cat Island
- Exuma
- Fresh Creek
- Freeport
- Governor's Harbour
- Green Turtle Cay
- Harbour Island
- High Rock
- Inagua
- Kemps Bay
- Long Island
- Mayaguana
- Marsh Harbour
- Nichollstown and Berry Islands
- New Providence
- Ragged Island
- Rock Sound
- Sandy Point
- San Salvador and Rum Cay
List based on Administrative divisions of the World.
Dov Gutterman, 25 October 2004


Beach Safety flags

The photo at http://www.flickr.com/ and accompanying caption would suggest that at least one beach in the Bahamas uses a safety flag system with four flags:
Yellow: Exercise caution
Yellow/Red diagonal: Strong surf; exercise extreme caution (in contrast to the use of such flags in AU/NZ/GB)
Red: Hazardous surf; no swimming
White with swimmer and red crossed circle: Beach closed, no access.
The extent of the swimming area is marked by buoys, not flags.
Jonathan Dixon, 18 September 2010