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BiPride flag

Last modified: 2006-04-15 by antonio martins
Keywords: bisexual | page (michael) | trillium |
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BiPride flag
image by António Martins, 10 May 2000
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Description and origin of the flag

Bisexuals are folks who like to play with either men or women.
Al Kirsch, 03 Feb 2001

The flag itself is a horizontal tricolor of magenta, lavender, and royal blue (PMS colors: top stripe 226, middle 258, bottom 286), in proportions 2:1:2. The overall proportions of the flag do not seem to be fixed, but instead are of the commercially available proportions, either 2:3 or 3:5. The designer, Michael Page, described the history and symbolism of the flag to me in personal correspondence as follows:

The BiPride Flag was unveiled at the BiCafe’s first Anniversary Party on Dec. 5th 1998. In that short period of time, the tri-colored flag has been referred to by Dr. Fritz Klein as being «A most important new Bi symbol» in the BiNet USA newsletter dated Winter 1998. […] The symbolism, Steve, is simply an evolution of the Pink and Blue triangles [an earlier symbol of the bisexual community — SK]. These triangles often overlap with purple being the resultant color. I designed the layout of the flag to reflect that overlap, because to me, the Lavender represents ’me’, a ’Middle Person’. I had a prototype developed and currently have over a thousand BiPride Flags in various shapes and sizes. Of all the past symbols for the bi movement or bisexuality, none were flaggable on a mass scale. To me, this new BiPride Flag will give Bi People the visibility necessary to invoke the presence we have at many GLBT [stands for "gay, lesbian, bisexual, and transgendered" — SK] events, but never had managed to effectively manifest in the past.
The flag is trademarked, and Michael Page is allowing us to post it. I believe we should note this on the page, together with the address of the BiCafe info@bicafe.com so that those who wish to use it may contact the proper authority for permission.
Steve Kramer, 16 and 18 Mar 1999


The trillium symbol

The BiCafe adds a relatively new symbol that resembles a trillium to represent bisexuals.
Steve Kramer, 16 Mar 1999