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Uzbekistan in the Soviet Union

Uzbekskaâ SSR / Ŭzbekiston SSR

Last modified: 2014-03-30 by zoltán horváth
Keywords: uzbekian ssr | uzbekistan | hammer and sickle (yellow) | hammer and sickle (grey) | star: 5 points (fimbriated) | sun: rising | cotton | u3.c.c.p. | ŭz.s.s.r. | ўз.С.С.Р. |
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Узбекская ССР / Ўзбекистон ССР

Flag of Uzbekian SSR in 1952
image by António Martins, 28 Oct 2002 | two-sided
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Description of the flag

Red with blue bar, fimbriated white, with the following measures (respective to the height of the flag, from top to bottom): 2/5ths of red, 1/50th of white, 8/50ths of green, 1/50th of white and 2/5ths of red. See here also detailed construction information of the hammer and sickle.
Mark Sensen, 25 May 1997

Stripes: 20+1+8+1+20. Star is contained in imaginary circle of diameter one-tenth of flag height. hammer and sickle in imaginary square of sides one-fifth of flag height. Imaginary circle of star touches the imaginary square of hammer and sickle. Centre of star is at point one-tenth of flag height from upper edge of flag. Vertical ax of star and hammer and sickle at one-third of flag height (= one-sixth of flag length).
Mark Sensen, 20 Jun 2001, quoting [sol85]

According to Sokolov’s book [sol85], the thin white stripes are not just due to a heraldic concern, as «The light-blue stripe symbolises the cloudless sky over Uzbekistan sending generous rays of the sun to the fertile soil. White edgings at the light-blue stripe represent advanced cotton growing — “the white gold” of the Republic.».
Mark Sensen, 20 Jun 2001

The last change of the soviet era was made on 29 August 1952 (Decree of the Presidium of the Supreme Soviet), when the striped flag was adopted. The blue is for the sky and the white is for the cotton; the red is the revolutionary struggle of the working masses; the hammer and sickle is the union of the workers and peasantry, and the star is symbol of the proletariat international. The flags have several regulations and dispositions about this: 1 November 1952, 30 December 1953, 31 October 1955, 27 September 1974, 14 October 1974 and 30 July 1981.
Jaume Ollé, 08 Oct 1996


Reverse of the flag

Back of the flag
image by António Martins, 28 Oct 2002 | two-sided reverse

No hammer, sickle and star on the reverse side.
Mark Sensen, 25 May 1997

Officially reverse looked like obverse without star and hammer-sickle. But in fact I never saw these flags without star, hammer-sickle. Real flags (all 15) usually were either with reverse analogous to obverse (but with star and hammer-and-sickle near the hoist) or with reverse = mirrored obverse.
Victor Lomantsov, 30 Nov 2002


Banner of the republic

Banner of Uzbek SSR
image by Marcus Schmöger, Željko Heimer and António Martins, 13 Oct 2006 | reconstruction

Many (all?) soviet republics had these banners. Usually it was red field with republican coat-of-arms and the name of republic. They had gold fringe. I know about such banner of Uzbekistan.
Victor Lomantsov, 09 Jan 2002


Coat of arms

soviet uzbek CoA
image by Marcus Schmöger, 16 Sep 2001 (source: [hzg80])

The emblem of the SSR was introduced on 14 February 1937 by art. 143 of the then constitution (according to Hesmer [hes92]) and it was replaced by the current one July 1992. The current emblem retains many parts of the old SSR one: the grain and cotton wreaths, the ribbon (in the national colours now, though) with inscription, the sun, and even the star: this is, however, an eight-pointed blue star now instead of the communist five-pointed red star.
Marcus Schmöger, 16 Sep 2001


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