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Historical Royal Standards (Thailand)

Last modified: 2007-04-14 by eugene ipavec
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King's Flag 1891-1910

Maharaj Flag or Raromraj-Thawach-Maha-Siamindra Flag / Royal Flag when the King is present

[King's Flag 1891-1910 (Thailand)]
image by Jaume Ollé and Miles Li

From the Singha Beer source:

Raromraj-Thawach-Maha-Siamindra
The "Maharaj" Flag or Royal Flag

This red flag [similar to th-kngnp.gif "Royal Flag when the King is present" but with dark blue instead of light blue] contains a dark blue rectangle, in the middle of which stands the national coat of arms. Above the coat of arms lies the Chakkra – symbol of Chakkri Dynasty – crowned by a trident, while above sits the Greater Crown of the Chakkri Kings.

The coat of arms itself is divided into three sections: the triple-headed white elephant fully-caparisoned against a plain yellow background, symbolizes northern, central, and southern Siam; the white elephant against a pink background represents Laos, while the crossed daggers against a red background symbolize Malaya, with a platform supporting the coat of arms and seven-tiered canopy against a yellow background.

The flag was designed in B.E. 2434 [1891 AD] during the reign of King Rama V. It was flown from the masts of Royal vessels or from the roof of the Royal Palace in Bangkok to indicate that the King was currently in residence. In B.E. 2440 [1897 AD], the flag, known as the "Maharaj" flag, was flown during royal processions or from the masts of Royal vessels or warships whenever His Majesty was on board – a practice that continued until B.E. 2453 [1910 AD].

Santiago Dotor, 27 Oct 1999


Royal Flag when the King is not present 1891-1897

Judhathippatai Flag

[Royal Flag when the King is present (Thailand)]
image by Jaume Ollé

From the Singha Beer source:

The Judhathippatai Flag
The Judhathippatai is a red flag with a beautifully caprisoned triple-headed elephant facint ["facing"?] the flag pole. On its back rests a howdah carrying the Royal Insignia. On the insignia itself one can see the initials "Jor-Por-Ror" – the initials of King Rama V, otherwise known as King Chulalongkorn, while above it stands a Pra Kiew or coronet. At the front and back of the elephant are more items of Royal regalia in the form of two multi-tiered white canopies. [Similar to th-kngpr.gif "Royal Flag when the King is not present" above but with green coloured "multi-tier canopies" and improved detail.]

This flag was first used as the national flag in B.E. 2434 [1891 AD] during the reign of King Rama V. Essentially, it replaced Ayyarapot flag created during the reign of King Rama IV and was designed to be flown over the Palace whenever the King was not in residence. It was used as a departmental flag by officers from the Military whenever they were sent on a mission during wartime. The flag, which remained in use right up until B.E.2440 [1897 AD], denoted the presence of the King or was used by officers from the military when lining up on parade to welcome royal dignitaries from abroad. Later, another Ayyarapot flag was created, somewhat similar in appearance to it predecessor, except for the fact that the "howdah" on the elephant's back carried the sacred syllable "Unalome". It was in use until B.E.2453 [1910 AD] when King Rama VI introduced a new Royal flag.

Santiago Dotor, 28 Oct 1999


Queen's Standard 1897-1910

Rachini Flag

[Queen's Standard  1897-1910 (Thailand)]
image by Jaume Ollé and Miles Li

From the Singha Beer source:

Rachini
The Queen's Standard

This red flag [like Royal Flag when the King is present, only adding a red swallowtail formed by two vertically opposite triangles whose ratio is 5:3 – hoist:fly as usual – and possibly changing light blue to dark blue], measuring 10 by 15 with one side cut into the shape of a bird's tail and the apex reaching a quarter of the way along the flag's total length, contains a dark blue rectangular measuring 6 by 8, in the middle of which stands the coat of arms – similar to the one on the Baromraj-thawach-maha-siamindra.

This flag which first appeared during the reign of King Rama V [1868-1910 AD], was designed for the exclusive use of the Queen. From B.E. 2440-2453 [1897-1910 AD] it was flown from the main mast of the Royal Yacht during official royal trips.

Santiago Dotor, 27 Oct 1999


Crown Prince's Flag 1897-1910

Yaowaraj

[Heir's Flag 1897-1910 (Thailand)]
image by Jaume Ollé and Miles Li

From the Singha Beer source:

Yaowaraj
This dark blue flag [like th-heir.gif by Jaume Ollé but with B++ instead of B-- and smaller elements], measuring 5 by 6, contains the national coat of arms in the middle. The coat of arms itself is divided into three sections, the triple-headed white elephant fully-caparisoned against a plain yellow background on top symbolizes northern, central and southern Siam, the white elephant against the pink background in the bottom right hand section represents Laos while the crossed curved and straight daggers against a red background in the bottom left hand section symbolize Malaya, supporting the Chakkra with a trident through the center, on the top of which is the Crown. Flanking the coat of arms stand two five-tiered canopies.

This flag was flown [from] the must [sic – maybe "mast"?] of the Royal Yacht of ["or"?] a battleship carrying the Crown Prince whenever he was on an official trip. It denoted the presence of ["on"?] board of the Crown Prince. The flag was in use from B.E. 2440 [1897 AD] until the end of King Rama V's reign in B.E. 2453 [1910 AD].

Santiago Dotor, 27 Oct 1999


Other Princes' Standard until 1910

Rajawong

[Other Princes 1891-1910 (Thailand)]
image by Jaume Ollé and Miles Li

From the Singha Beer source:

Rajawong Flag
This dark blue flag measuring 5î by 6î [sic – elsewhere these î "units" are omitted, so they are probably wrong here – I guess they are ratios rather than actual measures, since measures are in cm elsewhere] carries the national coat of arms in the middle, above which hovers the Chakkra or Royal Wheel with a trident through the center. Above the "Chakkra" stands a crown.

The Rajawong first made its appearance during the reign of King Rama V [1868-1910 AD] in accordance with Royal Decree R.S.116. It was flown from the main mast of the Royal Yacht or of any battleship carrying a member of the Royal family on an official visit. It denoted the presence on board of a senior member of the Royal Family, one deemed worthy of a 21-gun salute to be accompanied by the ship's officers lined up on parade, together with a full parade of military officers and a band playing the Royal Anthem. Lesser members of the Royal Family needed to have special permission from His Majesty the King before using the flag, which remained in use until B.E.2453 [1910 AD].

Santiago Dotor, 27 Oct 1999


Other Princesses' Standard 1899-1910

Rajawong Fai Nai

[Other Princesses' Standard 1899-1910 (Thailand)]
image by Jaume Ollé and Miles Li

From the Singha Beer source:

The Rajawong (Fai Nai)
The dark blue flag carries the national coat of arms in the middle, above which lies the Chakkra – the symbol of Chakkri Dynasty – crowned by a trident, while above that sits the Crown of the Chakkri Kings. The flag end is shaped like the tail of a bird. The flag – the flag of the female members of the Royal Family – was initiated by King Rama V in B.E.2442 [1899 AD]. Known at that time as the Rajawong Flag, it was in use until B.E.2453 [1910 AD].

Santiago Dotor, 27 Oct 1999


Other Members of the Royal Family

[Other Members of the Royal Family (Thailand)]

image by Jaume Ollé