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San Jose de Guaribe (Guarico, Venezuela)

Municipio San José de Guaribe

Last modified: 2004-08-07 by dov gutterman
Keywords: guarico | san jose de guaribe | guaribe |
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by Blas Delgado Ortiz, 3 July 2002


  • The Flag
  • Coat of Arms

  • See also:


    The Flag

    At <www.guaribe.com> there ia a photo of the flag and the following info::
    "Bandera municipal
    Descripción:
    Rectangulo de 2,00 m de largo y 1,70 m de ancho.  Presenta cuatro franjas con las siguientes características:
    -  Una franja azul, cercana al asta, dispuesta verticalmente  y rematada en un ligero pico, donde ostenta el Escudo Municipal.  Este color representa al cielo que cubre al Municipio, los nobles ideales y la mística del pueblo guaribense.
    -  Una franja horizontal roja, que simboliza el valor, el temple y el sacrificio que ofrenda el guaribense para sus logros y pleno desarrollo.
    -  Una franja horizontal gris, que recuerda al Río Guaribe, como en el Escudo, y la fortaleza espiritual de los habitantes del Municipio.
    -  Una franja horizontal marrón, simbolizando a la Madre Tierra venezolana, y a esta fecunda porción de su geografía."
    Pablo Acosta Ríos, 12 May 2002

    The Flag - Attributes and Semiology: It consists of a field with approximately ratio 2:3 divided on four stripes. The first one is sky-blue and occupies the vertical third near the hoist and presents a little point oriented to the center of the field; the another stripes occupies the center and fly of the field and are horizontal and unequal: the superior red and inferior brown ones wider 2/5 parts and the gray one, the rest fifth. The Municipality Coat of Arms in all its official heraldic attributes completes the design, located on the center of the sky-blue stripe. The sky-blue represents the sky that cover to the Municipality, the noble ideals and the mystic of the Guaribensian people. The red symbolizes the valor, the courage and the sacrifice which the Guaribensian offering for its profits and plenary development. The gray remembers the Guaribe River and the spiritual strength of the inhabitants of the Municipality. The brown symbolizes the Venezuelan Mother Ground, and to this fecund portion of its geography.
    Raul Jesus Orta Pardo, 28 May 2002


    Coat of Arms


    by Raul Jesus Orta Pardo, 31 May 2002

    The Coat of Arms - Attributes and Semiology: San José de Guaribe is a Municipality located at the east of the Guárico State, in the center of Venezuela. Its Coat of Arms consists of a germanic field per fess, the base per pale. The first quarter in azure (blue) loads a tree whose trunk shows three human faces: one black to the dexter, another aboriginal on the center and another Spanish white to the sinister, all rising of a gold pennant with the Latin motto  "SUB UMBRA FLOREO" (I flourish under its shade) that also cuts the blazon. The second quarter  in gules (red) presents a "Bandola" or an autochthonous  type of little guitar accompanied up and down by two native "Carrizos" or pan flutes. The third quarter an arrogant bull raised on a ground, all in it natural enamels. Between the base quarters and like division between its appears an Argent   thread that expands towards the base. Like external ornament, the blazon shows a rising sun surrounded by a rainbow in Or (yellow), Azure (blue) and Gules (red) like crest and like supports a corn branch and a flowered cotton one at the dexter; another of sorghum and of flowered tobacco at sinister jointed by means of a gules pennant that charges the following ephemeris and inscriptions  made in golden and capital gothic letters: "20-2-1904" (February 2nd,1904) "CREACIÓN" (Creation) at the dexter; "04-1-1989" (January 4th, 1989), "AUTONOMÍA" (Autonomy) at the sinister and "MUNICIPIO SAN JOSE DE GUARIBE, ESTADO GUÁRICO", (Saint Joseph of Guaribe, Guárico State) under the base. The first quarter, in Azure for symbolize the High Ideals, the Loyalty and the Perseverance of the inhabitants of the Municipality, presents a representation of a legendary tree called "Samán de Guaribe": emblem par excellence and expression of ancestral roots and regional dignity. The second quarter, in Gules for remember the valor, the courage and the sacrifice which the Guaribensian offering for its profits and plenary development shows three examples of its crafts and  musical temperament: a "Bandola"  or little guitar variation of the Venezuelan national instrument, the "Cuatro" (four strings) and two "Carrizos" or pan flutes. The third quarter, in brown or natural ground, shows a wild bull exemplary of its chaste which symbolizes the intense cattle activity of the locality. The rain-bowed sun symbolizes Venezuela and its progress to which the Municipality contributes with it hard work. The corn, the cotton, sorghum and tobacco recall the diverse fruits of this prodigal part of the Venezuelan Mother Ground throughout their history and the pennant is the synthesis of the origin, values, identity and sense of property of the Guaribensian People.
    - Historical Synthesis: On 1992, Licenciate Jose de Jesus Bustamante, native of Guaribe, makes contact with the Symbollogist Raul Jesus Orta Pardo with the purpose of crystallizing a symbollogical project conformed by a Flag and a Coat of Arms destined to identify this Municipality of Guárico State. Once made specific the graphical concept and determined the corresponding interpretative and legal aspects, the project was presented to the competent instances at that moment, those that decided to maintain it in suspense. With the renovation of municipal authorities the necessity of provide own symbols to San Jose de Guaribe was reframed, which was crystallized on March 12th, 2002 when solemnly it were presented to their community maintained and respected the original proposal.
    - Sources: Project of Flag and Coat of Arms for San José de Guaribe. José de Jesús Bustamante and Raúl Jesús Orta Pardo. Caracas, 1992.
    Raul Jesus Orta Pardo, 31 May 2002